Saturday, November 8, 2014

OTS: Dynamic Disclaimer

Much like BMT, OTS is an ever-changing entity.  It is a dynamic program that is constantly being reevaluated, reassessed, and reconfigured.  If you are one that prefers rigid structure and organization, you're going to be challenged while at OTS.  Semper Gumby, or whatever mantra you prefer to use, OTS is going to require that you go with the flow and be flexible.

My class, 15-01, was the first in a move away from the previous structure of upper and lower classes. Previously, there would be overlap in the classes at OTS, and the upper class would be actively involved in the indoctrination phase of the lower class (including assuming MTI-like "motivational training") and continued support of them throughout the mentoring phase.  There were upperclassmen assigned to lower class flights as Junior Flight Commanders and Assistant Junior Flight Commanders.  This system is no longer in place.  When other OTS grads I've talked to hear about this change, they are usually blown away.  I've heard this was half the battle, and that the upperclassmen used to "time jack" their lower class and have them sounding off in the hallways for hours.  I can only imagine that they phased out this program partially because it's too hard to monitor and standardize the treatment of Airmen when these OTs haven't been properly trained in a formal program to do so, and you run the risk of maltreatment.  Later in my OTS experience, I couldn't help but think that I was missing out by not being able to participate in this aspect of OTS.  I love mentoring others, and in the end I really enjoyed the interactions I had with members of 15-02.  

The rumblings we heard were that OTS was moving towards no overlap of classes whatsoever, so there would never be an upper or lower class at all.  With force shaping, I can see this being reality, with fewer and fewer people being sent to OTS.  I can only imagine that this is going to make OTS selections even more difficult.  

OTS is also moving towards a Total Force Integration (TFI) concept, and attempting to consolidate the Academy of Military Science (AMS), the OTS program for Guardsmen, and Basic Officer Training (BOT), the OTS program for active duty and Reservists.  AMS recently extended their program to (nearly) match the length of BOT.  We do a number of combined auditorium classes and combined activities, including the Blue Line ceremony, the Prop and Wings run, and Parade (on graduation day).  I really don't see a reason why the program are separate, given the extent of joint operations and TFI in the force, and I think that sentiment is shared by those behind this push.  Logistically there are some hurdles, but I think merging the two programs is feasible in the future and the components will benefit from the experiences of others.

The other challenge that Class 15-01 faced was the revision of the OTSMAN, which was being finalized during what felt like the first half of our program.  This is the guiding document behind all policies and procedures at OTS.  This made for inconsistencies in the expectations for us by commissioned staff members.  Some staff members would have the outdated procedures cemented in their heads, and that would conflict with the current procedures.  So, you'd be penalized by one staff member and not by another.  It led to a lot of confusion amongst OTs, even when we had the new OTSMAN in hand.  Near the end of my training, a group of students who performed well on the second OTSMAN test were asked to participate in a lengthy feedback session with OTS leaders to point out errors in the document and contribute to the revision process.  As for the syllabus?  Ha!  We didn't get it until the 6th week of training or so.  Examination of the BOT website as I write this reveals an absence of a syllabus link, so it's possible that it's being revised again.

Long story short, OTS is a dynamic program.  Expect change.  Prepare to be flexible.  Hang in there and know that the ends justify the means.  The staff is equally as confused as the trainees as times.  Don't be afraid to challenge those inconsistencies if you know you're in the right, "per the OTSMAN."  Like the chaplain loves to say, "It Gets Better!"

4 comments:

dklord said...

I joined the AF in 1975 and had my grandson join and depart for BMT today (12-16-14). I was looking at blogs/YouTube pages, saw yours, enjoyed it and thought I would say hi and a thank you for you and your families service for U.S. Best wishes and "Semper Fly."

Don Lord

Erin said...

@dklord - Thank you Don, and thank you for your service! Best of luck to your grandson, I know no one will be prouder than you on that graduation day!

Aunie said...

Wow--this post holds so true. Going into what is now TFOT, Total Force Officer Training, with a packing list and syllabus in-hand, it's so much different! I'm looking forward to seeing just how different my experience will be than yours was. :)

Erin said...

@Aunie - It's amazing how quickly things change. I'm practically a dinosaur at this point. ;)